Serving in florida barbara ehrenreich summary

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serving in florida barbara ehrenreich summary

Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting by in America by Barbara Ehrenreich

Reveals low-wage America in all its tenacity, anxiety, and surprising generosity--a land of Big Boxes, fast food, and a thousand desperate stratagems for survival.

Millions of Americans work full-time, year-round, for poverty-level wages. In 1998, Barbara Ehrenreich decided to join them. She was inspired in part by the rhetoric surrounding welfare reform, which promised that any job equals a better life. But how can anyone survive, let alone prosper, on $6-$7 an hour? To find out, Ehrenreich moved from Florida to Maine to Minnesota, taking the cheapest lodgings available and accepting work as a waitress, hotel maid, house cleaner, nursing home aide, and Wal-Mart salesperson. She soon discovered that even the lowliest occupations require exhausting mental and physical efforts. And one job is not enough; you need at least two if you intend to live indoors.

Nickel and Dimed reveals low-wage America in all its tenacity, anxiety, and surprising generosity--a land of Big Boxes, fast food, and a thousand desperate stratagems for survival. Instantly acclaimed for its insight, humor, and passion, this book is changing the way America perceives its working poor.
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Nickel & Dimed, Part 5

serving in florida summary analysis

Excellent analysis of the reading. Serving in Florida. Serving in Florida Analysis. Serving in Florida is extremely effective because Ehrenreich places the reader in the shoes of poor Americans. Nickel and Dimed by Barbara Ehrenreich. Search this site.

Next, Ehrenreich looks through the want ads, ruling out certain occupations, such as hotel front-desk clerk, and trying to steer away from waitressing. After some searching, housekeeping seems to be the most attractive option. Ehrenreich aces the interview, but she is told she must do a urine test before beginning work. After shuffling from one hotel and supermarket to another for three days and not hearing back from a single one of the twenty or so places to which she has applied, Ehrenreich begins to realize that the want ads are highly unreliable indicators of the jobs available at any given time. One day Ehrenreich finally lands a job, at a big discount chain hotel.

Barbara Ehrenreich begins her low-wage experiment near where she lives in Key, West Florida. One of her major fears is that she will be recognized by one of the locals, and she will have to explain her investigation of the working poor. As her job search begins, she realizes that there is no relationship between the number of ads and the number of jobs available. In the low-wage job market, the turnover is so high that major hotel and restaurant chains always keep the help wanted ads running. The test asked what dollar amount of stolen goods had the prospective employee purchased in the last year, or would he or she turn in a fellow employee for stealing. Marijuana is the one drug that is most likely to be picked up because it stays in the body for weeks after it has been ingested. Heroine and cocaine are also tested for.

"Serving In Florida". Barbara Ehrenreich. '' employees have to provide parts of their uniforms like shoes and pants. These expenses are a.
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Ehrenreich focused on her experiences as a waiter and housekeeping simultaneously. She vividly describes the living and working conditions of lower income people, whom became robots performing their duties. Throughout a very descriptive and embellish language, she explains her thoughts, emotions, and opinions of how to live in a costly city as a low-wage worker. This essay infers how the employees are fearful of loosing their jobs even though they are forced to work in inhumane conditions such as long hours, with no breaks between shifts, and deprived of food at times. Because of these people needs, managers use strategies to exert control on them and to take advantaged of their situation, for example, paying minimum salary rates, no providing appropriate healthcare protective plan, offering poor work conditions, demoralizing employees in front of other co-workers with inappropriate attitude, and verbally abusing them evidenced by screaming at and blaming for stealing products without proof of their actions, just to mention some. The most important lesson I learned in this essay was to sympathize with those workaholic people that provide services to us. This is very common in our society causing employees to suffer physical and mental health issues, for instance, muscle spasm, fatigue, headaches, anxiety, or depression because of the stress of the lifestyle.

3 thoughts on “Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting by in America by Barbara Ehrenreich

  1. Serving in Florida. Barbara Ehrenreich begins her low-wage experiment near where she lives in Key, West Florida. One of her major fears is that she will be.

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