Witch craze terror and fantasy in baroque germany

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witch craze terror and fantasy in baroque germany

Witch Craze: Terror and Fantasy in Baroque Germany by Lyndal Roper

A powerful account of witches, crones, and the societies that make them

From the gruesome ogress in Hansel and Gretel to the hags at the sabbath in Faust, the witch has been a powerful figure of the Western imagination. In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries thousands of women confessed to being witches—of making pacts with the Devil, causing babies to sicken, and killing animals and crops—and were put to death. This book is a gripping account of the pursuit, interrogation, torture, and burning of witches during this period and beyond.

Drawing on hundreds of original trial transcripts and other rare sources in four areas of Southern Germany, where most of the witches were executed, Lyndal Roper paints a vivid picture of their lives, families, and tribulations. She also explores the psychology of witch-hunting, explaining why it was mostly older women that were the victims of witch crazes, why they confessed to crimes, and how the depiction of witches in art and literature has influenced the characterization of elderly women in our own culture.
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Published 06.12.2018

Witch Hunt: A Century of Murder Episode 1 & 2

A powerful account of witches, crones, and the societies that make them From the gruesome ogress in Hansel and Gretel to the hags at the sabbath in Faust , the witch has been a powerful figure of the Western imagination. In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries thousands of women confessed to being witches--of making pacts with the Devil, causing babies to sicken, and killing animals and crops--and were put to death. This book is a gripping account of the pursuit, interrogation, torture, and burning of witches during this period and beyond.
Lyndal Roper

Witch Craze: Terror and Fantasy in Baroque Germany

A powerful account of witches, crones, and the societies that make them From the gruesome ogress in Hansel and Gretel to the hags at the sabbath in Faust , the witch has been a powerful figure of the Western imagination. In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries thousands of women confessed to being witches—of making pacts with the Devil, causing babies to sicken, and killing animals and crops—and were put to death. This book is a gripping account of the pursuit, interrogation, torture, and burning of witches during this period and beyond. Drawing on hundreds of original trial transcripts and other rare sources in four areas of Southern Germany, where most of the witches were executed, Lyndal Roper paints a vivid picture of their lives, families, and tribulations. She also explores the psychology of witch-hunting, explaining why it was mostly older women that were the victims of witch crazes, why they confessed to crimes, and how the depiction of witches in art and literature has influenced the characterization of elderly women in our own culture.

From the gruesome ogress in Hansel and Gretel to the hags at the sabbath in Faust, the witch has been a powerful figure of the Western imagination. In the.
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From the gruesome ogress in Hansel and Gretel to the hags at the sabbath in Faust , the witch has been a powerful figure of the Western imagination. - Walter Stephens, L yndal R oper.

The study of witchcraft in Early Modern Europe has become an industry and continues to grow. The book is based upon the archival trial evidence and confessions that survive. But as Roper writes in the preface, 'this book is not just about trials for witchcraft'. The book also explores the psychological framework through which witchcraft [End Page ] beliefs were structured in Baroque German art, literature, theology, philosophy and law. Witch Craze aims to investigate the 'fantasy, envy and terror' of witch hunting in Baroque Germany. The scope of Roper's inquiry is from mid-fifteenth century, through the worst excesses of witch-hunting in the early seventeenth century and concludes with a discussion of how witch-hunting gradually came to an end in the German-speaking lands of the Holy Roman Empire. The book is broken into four sections: 'Persecution', which details the Baroque cultural landscape and legal mechanisms used to prosecute witchcraft; 'Fantasy' and 'Womanhood' which are the heart of Roper's inquiry into the fears that drove witch-hunting; and finally 'The Witch', where she explores the decline of witch trials in the eighteenth century.

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4 thoughts on “Witch Craze: Terror and Fantasy in Baroque Germany by Lyndal Roper

  1. From the way the devil is described in the court records of early modern Germany, you can see he was quite a catch.

  2. Witch Craze: Terror and Fantasy in Baroque Germany [Lyndal Roper] on Amazon .com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. A powerful account of witches.

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