Police and criminal evidence act 1984 pace

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police and criminal evidence act 1984 pace

Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 (PACE): code C, revised code of practice for the detention, treatment and questioning of persons by police officers by Great Britain: Home Office

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Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 and its Codes of Practice.

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Great Britain: Home Office

Gaining access to an adult suspected to be at risk of neglect or abuse

The aim of PACE has always been to establish a balance between the powers of the police in England and Wales and the rights of members of the public. No equivalent act exists in Scots Law. Although PACE is a fairly wide ranging piece of legislation, it mainly deals with police powers to search an individual or premises, including their powers to gain entry to those premises, the handling of exhibits seized from those searches, and the treatment of suspects once they are in custody, including being interviewed. Specific legislation as to more wide ranging conduct of a criminal investigation is contained within the Criminal Procedures and Investigation Act Sign In Don't have an account?

Context and background

The aim of this guide is to clarify existing powers relating to access to adults suspected to be at risk of abuse or neglect. The safeguarding duties under the Care Act apply to an adult who:. The guide has been created to provide information on legal options for gaining access to people who fulfil the three criteria above, where access is restricted or denied. It is intended as a reference in situations of uncertainty, rather than as a learning tool. Throughout the guide you will find links to information on the relevant legislation and case law, should you wish to consult this.

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