Stephen witt how music got free

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stephen witt how music got free

The Devil Quotes (50 quotes)

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Published 07.03.2019

Stephen Witt, "How Music Got Free"

In , with the record business well into a seemingly bottomless free fall, Doug Morris, the chairman and chief executive of the Universal Music Group, was interviewed by Wired magazine. The shorthand summary of this era will inevitably point to the debut of Napster in as the death knell for the record business, but Witt pulls back to tell a bigger story. There were numerous forces — from the creation of the MP3 format to the continuing consolidation of the major labels — that needed to align in order to create the situation in which peer-to-peer file sharing could become so dominant so quickly.

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Look Inside. Jun 16, Minutes Buy. Jun 14, ISBN Jun 16, ISBN Jun 16, Minutes. How Music Got Free is a riveting story of obsession, music, crime, and money, featuring visionaries and criminals, moguls and tech-savvy teenagers. Journalist Stephen Witt traces the secret history of digital music piracy, from the German audio engineers who invented the mp3, to a North Carolina compact-disc manufacturing plant where factory worker Dell Glover leaked nearly two thousand albums over the course of a decade, to the high-rises of midtown Manhattan where music executive Doug Morris cornered the global market on rap, and, finally, into the darkest recesses of the Internet.

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How Music Got Free is a riveting story of obsession, music, crime, and money, featuring visionaries and criminals, moguls and tech-savvy teenagers. Journalist Stephen Witt traces the secret history of digital music piracy, from the German audio engineers who invented the mp3, to a North Carolina compact-disc manufacturing plant where factory worker Dell Glover leaked nearly two thousand albums over the course of a decade, to the high-rises of midtown Manhattan where music executive Doug Morris cornered the global market on rap, and, finally, into the darkest recesses of the Internet., Stephen Witt. Journalist Stephen Witt tracks the history of the mp3 music player from its invention to its adaptation as a standard feature of daily life.

T he humble MP3 is one of the most momentous inventions of modern history. It thus made possible the culture of downloading commercial music without paying that brought the global music industry to its knees. Yet this vehicle of mass copyright infringement would never have been invented itself without the guarantee of strong copyright protection. In most histories of these developments, the users who began swapping MP3s on the internet are presented as ordinary folk: college students on Napster and then pretty much everyone on BitTorrent. This gives the story a democratic feel, with the music-loving people rising up against the venal idiocies of the corporate music world.

Witt brings fresh reporting to bear, and complicates things in terrific ways. Witt, a first-time author, comes from the world of finance, and his old-fashioned, connect-the-dots reporting presents a nuanced depiction of an issue usually reduced to emotional absolutes. Suspenseful, entertaining. Essential reading for all students of the music business. A story that's too bizarre to make up, but needed to be told.

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