First black woman to become a millionaire

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first black woman to become a millionaire

The Black Rose by Tananarive Due

Born to former slaves on a Louisiana plantation in 1867, Madam C.J. Walker rose from poverty and indignity to become Americas first black female millionaire, the head of a hugely successful beauty company, and a leading philanthropist in African American causes. Renowned author Alex Haley became fascinated by the story of this extraordinary heroine, and before his death in 1992, he embarked on the research and outline of a major novel based on her life. Now with The Black Rose, critically acclaimed writer Tananarive Due brings Haleys work to an inspiring completion.

Blending documented history, vivid dialogue, and a sweeping fictionalized narrative, Tananarive Due paints a vivid portrait of this passionate and tenacious pioneer and the unforgettable era in which she lived.
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Published 01.07.2019

Inspiring Story of one of America's First African American Millionaires

Madam C.J. Walker wasn't the first African American millionaire

Madam C. Born Sarah Breedlove, she was widowed by age 20 and took work as a laundress. A talent for self-promotion helped build a booming enterprise, and she spent lavishly on luxurious homes. Born Sarah Breedlove, the daughter of Louisiana sharecroppers, Walker was orphaned at six, married at fourteen, and widowed at twenty with a two-year-old daughter to care for. She resettled in St. Louis and went to work as a laundress.

Sarah Breedlove (December 23, – May 25, ), known as Madam C. J. Walker, was an African-American entrepreneur, philanthropist, and a political and social activist. Walker was considered the wealthiest African-American businesseswoman Although she was eulogized as the first female self-made millionaire in the.
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Walker, who invented the process for straightening kinky hair, rather than for Dr. Walker usually makes an appearance. Madam C. Only one is factual, sort of, but the amazing story behind it and how Madam Walker used that accomplishment to help others as a job creator and philanthropist might be jarring — and surprisingly empowering — even to the skeptics. I know it was for me in revisiting her life for this column. While the rest of her siblings had been born on the other side of emancipation, Sarah was free. But by 7, she was an orphan toiling in those same cotton fields.

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